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 Results 11424 to 11473 of 18612  | <<First | <Previous | Next> | Halfway To End | Last>>
 Image   Title   Description   Collection   Number   Document 
    “Jack The Ripper,” C&O F-10 4-6-0 #129 was the “big engine” that was assigned to the first FFV trains over the mountains between Clifton Forge and Charlottesville and Clifton Forge and Hinton. Seen here is later years it was still a snappy looking classic tapered boiler engine of the era.    COHS   37326 
    Getting up to speed with its seven cars, The FFV (No. 3) leaves Alderson, West Virginia, on the morning of October 16, 1909 at 9:38 a.m. just an hour late due to heavy mail business. Consist appears to be full RPO, Combine (baggage/coach), two coaches, diner, and two sleepers. A fuzzy but a remarkable action photo for a hundred years ago. W. W. Stevens Photo   COHS   37327 
    A superb classic photo of A-6 4-4-0 No. 55 and a passenger train at an unknown locale in the mid-1890s with its whole crew posing. By this time C&O passenger train crews had uniforms of at sort, at least caps. Note the arched-door RPO/Express car behind the tender. It is still the era of the link-and-pin coupler and giant wooden pilot. The bell is polished and fairly shining.    COHS   37328 
    This C&O train, seen here at the end of the wooden era in 1909-10, has a high-stepping 4-4-2 Atlantic in charge of its seven-car consist of full express, full RPO, and five passenger-carrying cars, at Ft. Spring, West Virginia.    COHS   37329 
    When C&O bought the Chicago, Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad that eventually became its Chicago Division, it began to run its name trains straight through Cincinnati and on to Chicago directly, even though it also continued through interline Pullmans on Big Four trains to that point as well. Here C&O 4-4-2 Atlantic No. 89 is departing Chicago in about 1911 with one of the through trains. This arrangement lasted, with many alterations over the years, until the World War I era.    COHS   37330 
    By the turn of the 20th Century C&O had a number of branch lines in operation and was running local passenger trains on them. Here a one-car train is about to leave Thurmond, West Virginia, to go up the Loup Creek Branch in about 1900 with an 1870s arched window open platform combine car and probably a 2-8-0.    COHS   37331 
    A four car train behind 4-4-0 No. 54 is on the Greenbrier Branch soon after it was opened in 1901. This branch supplied lumber products for the next sixty years and was one of the few C&O branches not devoted to coal. Its passenger traffic held up well, with the last branch line trains running until 1957.   COHS   37332 
    This wonderful, high quality glass plate photo from the late 1890s shows a train time crowd of passengers at Clifton Forge, Virginia, C&O’s mountain terminal. The giant depot/hotel was painted orange with white trim, while the railroad YMCA (for train crews) beside it appears in more subdued colors.    COHS   37333 
    This is an interior builder’s photo of one of the original 1889 FFV coaches. Note the ornate decorations on the walls and especially the ceiling. Pullman photo.   COHS   37334 
    Full RPO car No. 87 was built by C&O shops in 1900 with a steel underframe. By this time railway mail service was hitting its stride in efficiency and performance and the many “apartment” RPO cars C&O was using were supplemented by full cars on its mainline name trains. No. 87 had a steel underframe and end posts and thus is termed a “composite” wood/steel car. The RPOs were the first to get strengthening because the rode in a dangerous position right behind the locomotive. ICC Valuation photo.    COHS   37335 
    Huntington shops turned out this “apartment” RPO and express car in 1901. It seems to have had a very small RPO section with only one window and was probably used on secondary trains, and is shown here at Ashland, Kentucky in 1915, probably on a Louisville-bound train. ICC Valuation photo.   COHS   37336 
    At first mail and express were combined in the same car, but as volume of both increased, separate cars were often needed. His is full express car 145 built at Huntington in 1904, and pictured at Clifton Forge in 1915. ICC Valuation photo.   COHS   37337 
    This is one of the few builder photos we have which show the original FFV cars in 1889. It is combination car #204. Note the train name on the letter board and the ends of the car and the narrow vestibules. The interior of the car had simple walk-over reversible seating and a combination of electric and gas lights. The ornate carved paneling was used even in this humble car. Pullman photo.   COHS   37338 
    This is one of the few builder photos we have which show the original FFV cars in 1889. It is combination car #204. Note the train name on the letter board and the ends of the car and the narrow vestibules. The interior of the car had simple walk-over reversible seating and a combination of electric and gas lights. The ornate carved paneling was used even in this humble car. Pullman photo.   COHS   37339 
    This superb Pullman glass-plate photo of FFV Combine 213 taken at the Pullman plant in 1902 shows the quick evolution from the narrow to the wide vestibule. The narrow construction was found too limited and the wide-full car width vestibule was safer, easier to use for boarding, roomier, and generally a better device. The colors are actually visible in this black and white photo. The body is bright orange, the letterboard maroon, the lettering and striping gold leaf. Pullman photo.   COHS   37340 
    Although Pullman got most of C&O’s business after 1889, Barney & Smith was still supplying cars, as Combine 226 attests. Built by Barney & Smith in October 1893, it had the narrow vestibules, which it still has in this 1915 photo. ICC Valuation photo.   COHS   37341 
    C&O was constantly introducing new names to its existing trains and adjusting their consists and schedules. Combine car No. 217 shown here is a steel underframe composite car delivered in 1907 for the C&O Limited. Since tail signs weren’t yet in vogue, the train name appeared on the baggage side of the combines much as the FFV name appeared on the letter boards. Pullman photo.   COHS   37342 
    The FFV was completely re-equipped beginning in the late 1890s and this wonderful wooden coach was built for the train in 1902 still emblazoned with the name at each end. Pullman photo.   COHS   37343 
    Coach No. 396 from 1903 was comparable in every way to the FFV cars except the name was omitted from the scrollwork at the car ends. The interior of cars is much simpler in design by this time as compared with that of the 1889 era seen previously. Pullman photo.   COHS   37344 
    Coach No. 396 from 1903 was comparable in every way to the FFV cars except the name was omitted from the scrollwork at the car ends. The interior of cars is much simpler in design by this time as compared with that of the 1889 era seen previously. Pullman photo.   COHS   37345 
    Another of the non-Pullman cars of the narrow vestibule era included this Barney & Smith product of 1893, seen at Huntington in 1915. ICC Valuation photo by C&O Railway.   COHS   37346 
    To accommodate first class passengers on routes and times not served by sleeping cars, C&O rostered a group of very high class parlor cars. No. 492 is seen new at Pullman in 1909 at the very close of the wooden era. The interior consisted of very comfortable swiveling overstuffed chairs with a wooden bench at the bulkhead. One can only imagine elite of society in this car being served light meals and drinks. Pullman photo.   COHS   37347 
    To accommodate first class passengers on routes and times not served by sleeping cars, C&O rostered a group of very high class parlor cars. No. 492 is seen new at Pullman in 1909 at the very close of the wooden era. The interior consisted of very comfortable swiveling overstuffed chairs with a wooden bench at the bulkhead. One can only imagine elite of society in this car being served light meals and drinks. Pullman photo.   COHS   37348 
    C&O provided Parlor cars in the coal fields as well. After all, the mine operators, owners, managers, agents, buyers, etc. wanted some first class service as well, even on branch lines. Here a Barney & Smith parlor built in 1889 with narrow vestibules (and probably used on the FFV and other name trains then) is at Quinnimont, West Virginia, being used on a local coal-fields train in 1915. ICC Valuation photo by C&O Ry.   COHS   37349 
    In 1906 Pullman built dining car No. 453 for FFV service. The interior view certainly shows a drastically simpler décor than the 1889 FFV diners, with carpeted floor, decorative niches between large picture windows, arched clerestory widow, and mirrored buffet on the kitchen bulkhead. Still a high-class car. Pullman photo.   COHS   37350 
    In 1906 Pullman built dining car No. 453 for FFV service. The interior view certainly shows a drastically simpler décor than the 1889 FFV diners, with carpeted floor, decorative niches between large picture windows, arched clerestory widow, and mirrored buffet on the kitchen bulkhead. Still a high-class car. Pullman photo.   COHS   37351 
    The other name trains were not neglected as C&O was reequipping the FFV in the first decade of the 20th Century as attested by Diner No. 452 built in 1909. It would have a short life, being replaced by steel cars within a decade. Pullman photo.   COHS   37352 
    We have found no photos of the early wooden-era Pullman cars uses on C&O, but this fine view of the car Alderson dates from 1907. When possible Pullman assigned cars to C&O trains with names associated with the line as in this case, Alderson being a small town of about 1,000 people along the C&O mainline in Greenbrier & Monroe counties West Virginia. It was a 12-section and 1-drawing room car as can be discerned by looking at its exterior wall. The interior view shows the sections set up for day travel. Pullman photo.   COHS   37353 
    We have found no photos of the early wooden-era Pullman cars uses on C&O, but this fine view of the car Alderson dates from 1907. When possible Pullman assigned cars to C&O trains with names associated with the line as in this case, Alderson being a small town of about 1,000 people along the C&O mainline in Greenbrier & Monroe counties West Virginia. It was a 12-section and 1-drawing room car as can be discerned by looking at its exterior wall. The interior view shows the sections set up for day travel. Pullman photo.   COHS   37354 
    The early FFV train sets got observation cars early in their careers. No. 402 was Pullman-built in 1894 for the FFV and had the traditional open platform observation end. The interior is seen in the second photo with the usual wicker chairs. The paneling appears to be gold inlay and the ceiling has tasteful (for the era) decorations. One would think the wicker chairs odd today, but in this era long before air-conditioning, they were more comfortable as the allowed better air circulation around the body. Pullman photo.   COHS   37355 
    The early FFV train sets got observation cars early in their careers. No. 402 was Pullman-built in 1894 for the FFV and had the traditional open platform observation end. The interior is seen in the second photo with the usual wicker chairs. The paneling appears to be gold inlay and the ceiling has tasteful (for the era) decorations. One would think the wicker chairs odd today, but in this era long before air-conditioning, they were more comfortable as the allowed better air circulation around the body. Pullman photo.   COHS   37356 
    C&O acquired other Pullman-built parlor cars, including No. 483 seen here on a train at Clifton Forge in 1915. They were particularly usde between Huntington and Clifton Forge so people could view the great West Virginia scenery along the C&O route. ICC Valuation photo by C&O Ry.   COHS   37357 
    C&O composite 50-ton hopper car number 53048 NEW 8-43 series 53000-53749 near side view with B-end showing.    COHS   37358 
    C&O composite 50-ton hopper car number 54398 series 54250-55379 NEW 8-43 broadside view.   COHS   37359 
    C&O composite 50-ton hopper car number 54398 series 54250-55379 near side view with B-end showing.   COHS   37360 
    C&O composite 50-ton hopper car number 54398 series 54250-55379 NEW 8-43 near side view with A-end showing.   COHS   37361 
    C&O composite 50-ton hopper car number 54398 series 54250-55379 NEW 8-43 near end view of B-end.   COHS   37362 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   Casino Park and Newport News Academy, Newport News, Va. Day-light view of Casino & Academy; sailing ships at anchor in harbor. Color-tinted, un-divided back, postally unused. No. 9171, copyright, 1905, by Detroit Publishing Co. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37363 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   Lovers Walk, Casino Grounds, C. & O. Coal Piers in distance, Newport News, Va. Color-tinted RPPC of dirt walking path bordered by trees at water's edge. Divided-back, photographer, publisher and printer not indicated. No. R-26333. Postmark 04 July 1913. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37364 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   C. & O. Railroad Station, Newport News, Va. North view of station face and Steamship Company office toward Pier 2; horse & wagon teams. Green tint RPPC, published by Souvenir Post Card Co., New York, No. 3631. Un-divided back (pre-1907), postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin   COHS   37365 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   C. & O. R. R. Station, Newport News, Va. Color-tinted, northeast view RPPC view of station; train on pier; streetcar; horse & buggy; pedestrians at train time. Divided-back; postally unused. Photographer, publisher, and printer not indicated. No. R-26329. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin   COHS   37366 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   C. & O. R. R. Station, Newport News, Va. Northeast view of station face; train on pier; very early automobiles; pedestrians at train time. Color-tinted (significant blue) RPPC, published by Louis Kaufmann & Sons, Baltimore, MD., No. A-44160. Made in U.S.A. Printed by Curt Teich & Co. (Chicago) in "C. T. Photochrom" Divided-back; postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37367 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   Newport News, Va. Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Station and Pier. (1st card) Eastern view of station & pier; Class A-15 American #84 (?) under shed; constable w/bobby-style hat; bicycle; one early automobile; horse & buggy; horse drawn ice wagon; streetcard (C&O Station in destination signboard); Milepost 10. Color-tinted RPPC, published by The Leighton & Valentine Co., N.Y. City, No. 28345. Printed in United States. Divided-back; postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37368 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection    Newport News, Va. Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Station and Pier. (2nd card) Eastern view of station & pier; Class A-15 American #84 (?) under shed; constable w/bobby-style hat; bicycle; one early automobile; horse & buggy; horse drawn ice wagon; streetcard (C&O Station in destination signboard); Milepost 10. Color-tinted RPPC, published by The Hugh C. Leighton Co.,Manufacturers, Portland, ME., No. 28345. Made in Germany. Divided-back; postmark 1909. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37369 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   The Chesapeake and Ohio Passenger depot and Pier of the S. S. Virginia, Newport News, Va. Early eastern view of station face and pier from Warwick Park; Pier 2 on left. Color-tinted RPPC published by The American News Company, New York, Leipzig, Berlin, Dresden. Printed in "Litho-Chrome" in Germany. Divided-back; postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin   COHS   37370 
 Newport News; Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   C. & O. Station and Pier, Newport News, Va. Southeasterly aerial view with Steamship Company office in foreground taken from Division Office Building; sailing ships and one steamship at anchor in Hampton Roads. Color-tinted, white border RPPC, heavily retouched. Published by Louis Kaufmann & Sons, Baltimore, MD., No. A-70624. Made in U.S.A. by Curt Teich & Co. (Chicago) as " C. T. American Art." Divided-back; postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37371 
 Newport News, Terminal; C&O. Catlin Collection   C. & O. Passenger Station, Pier and Elevator, Newport News, Va. Northwest view from the water with Chesapeake Bay skipjack sailboat in foreground; station, Pier 1, S.S. Virginia, Pier 2, and elevator in background. Color-tinted RPPC published by Louis Kaufmann & Sons, Baltimore, MD., No. A-44159. Made in U.S.A, by Curt Teich & Co. (Chicago) in "C. T. Photochrom." Divided-back, postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37372 
 Newport News, Terminal, C&O. Catlin Collection   C. & O. Building, Newport News, Va. Three-quarter view of Chesapeake & Ohio Steamship Co. Ltd. office building with outside coal bin. Sign overhead also says "Furness Withy & Co., Ltd. Agents" Color-tinted RPPC, published by A. C. Bosselman & Co., New York, No. 6314. Made in Germany. Divided-back, postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37373 
 Newport News, Terminal, C&O. Catlin Collection   New C. & O. Building, Newport News, Va. Westerly view of Division office building showing below-grade marble steps and basement entrance. Color-tinted, white border RPPC published by Louis Kaufmann & Sons, Baltimore, MD., No. A-75525. Made in U.S.A. by Curt Teich & Co. (Chicago) in "C. T. American Art." Divided-back, postally unused. C&O Postcard Collection of R. I. Catlin    COHS   37374 
    What appears to be an F-15 Pacific type is shown bringing an 11-car westbound train into Charleston, West Virginia, in about 1914, at the opening of the era of modernization. New A-16 4-4-2 Atlantics and F-15 class 4-6-2 Pacifics arrived on C&O in 1902/03 and were operated on all the mainline trains by the date of this photo. Mountain type 4-8-2s were, by this time, also handling the heaviest trains Charlottesville-Hinton. Most cars on this train probably were still wooden except perhaps the RPO and a coach or diner.    COHS   37375 
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